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Ocean pollution. Climate change. Man-made disaster or nature's "myth"? Seeing's believing: shocking evident photos


By WcP.Common.Sense - Posted on 09 December 2009

*update* 06 August 2014
Humans have tripled mercury levels in upper ocean

dead fish floating belly-up in polluted waters

(quote)

There are several causes of ocean pollution including oil pollution, marine debris, toxic materials, and ocean dumping and mining. Oil pollution is not only caused by large devastating tanker spills, it is also caused through runoff from land and industrial wastes which find their way to the ocean through drains. Other causes include intensive farming, septic tank, pesticide, animal dung, household waste, water table, waste water, nuclear waste...

The cycle of the Earth’s waters is continuous, carrying and spreading pollutants introduced by human activity all around the planet. Intensive farming, septic tank, pesticide, oil spill, animal dung, industrial waste, household waste, water table, waste water, nuclear waste, oil pollution...

Ocean Pollution - Ocean Garbage - Marine Debris

There are several causes of ocean pollution including oil pollution, marine debris, toxic materials, and ocean dumping and mining. Oil pollution is not only caused by large devastating tanker spills, it is also caused through runoff from land and industrial wastes which find their way to the ocean through drains.

’Ocean Pollution: Shamefully yours! Birds with gut full of plastic objects. ‘The bird probably mistook the plastics for food and ingested them while foraging for prey. The plastic goes down the gullet quite easily. But since it is not digested, as in the original plan for all life, it gets stuck before exiting the stomach. There it sits to block the entry and digestion of legitimate food. Even the tiniest of pieces can cause blockages.’ Only if all nations adopt a ‘Zero Waste’ policy, could marine pollution be stopped!’

Marine Debris often comes in the form of our trash which has been washed into the ocean after heavy rain or floods. A particular danger to marine wildlife are nets which have fallen of boats or plastics which can be swallowed and caught in an animals digestive system.

Toxic materials accumulate in the ocean in the form of mercury, dioxin, PCBs, PAHs, Radioactivity. Both dumping and exploitation of ocean resources cause ocean pollution also.

Seabirds are not the only species affected here. Numerous species are affected, and something needs to done to clean up the plastic vortex. At least 267 species including whales, fish, turtles, seals, sea lions and seabirds have ingested or become entangled in the debris. The sad truth is that unless something is done t clean up the mess, many more marine life species will continue to die or face unnecessary trauma. The human way of life has taken a roll on the earth. The carelessness that humans have lived by for thousands of years can no longer sustain on this planet without serious consequenses.

Seas of garbage
Solid garbage also makes its way to the ocean. Plastic bags, balloons, glass bottles, shoes, packaging material - if not disposed of correctly, almost everything we throw away can reach the sea.

Plastic garbage, which decomposes very slowly, is often mistaken for food by marine animals. High concentrations of plastic material, particularly plastic bags, have been found blocking the breathing passages and stomachs of many marine species, including whales, dolphins, seals, puffins, and turtles. Plastic six-pack rings for drink bottles can also choke marine animals.

A stranded oil drum on the west coast of Vancouver Island. There are several causes of ocean pollution including oil pollution, marine debris, toxic materials, and ocean dumping and mining. Oil pollution is not only caused by large devasting tanker spills, it is also caused through runoff from land and industrial wastes which find their way to the ocean through drains. Marine Debris often comes in the form of our trash which has been washed into the ocean after heavy rain or floods. A particular danger to marine wildlife are nets which have fallen of boats or plastics which can be swollowed and caught in an animals digestive system. Toxic materials accumulate in the ocean in the form of mercury, dioxin, PCBs, PAHs, Radioactivity. Both dumping and exploitation of ocean resources cause ocean pollution also.

This garbage can also come back to shore, where it pollutes beaches and other coastal habitats.

Sewage disposal
In many parts of the world, sewage flows untreated, or under-treated, into the ocean. For example, 80% of urban sewage discharged into the Mediterranean Sea is untreated.

This sewage can also lead to eutrophication. In addition, it can cause human disease and lead to beach closures.

Many of the pressures that are threatening the health of our seas. Whether it be overfishing, pollution, destruction of reef habitats, or the threatening of foundational organisms in the ecosystem, it is clear that many of these problems are due to human activity.

Toxic chemicals
Almost every marine organism, from the tiniest plankton to whales and polar bears, is contaminated with man-made chemicals, such as pesticides and chemicals used in common consumer products.

Some of these chemicals enter the sea through deliberate dumping. For centuries, the oceans have been a convenient dumping ground for waste generated on land. This continued until the 1970s, with dumping at sea the accepted practice for disposal of nearly everything, including toxic material such as pesticides, chemical weapons, and radioactive waste.

oil-covered penguins; industrial pollution

Dumping of the most toxic materials was banned by the London Dumping Convention in 1972, and an amended treaty in 1996 (the London Convention) further restricted what could be dumped at sea. However, there are still the problems of already-dumped toxic material, and even the disposal of permitted substances at sea can be a substantial environmental hazard.

Chemicals also enter the sea from land-based activities. Chemicals can escape into water, soil, and air during their manufacture, use, or disposal, as well as from accidental leaks or fires in products containing these chemicals. Once in the environment, they can travel for long distances in air and water, including ocean currents.

There are several causes of ocean pollution including oil pollution, marine debris, toxic materials, and ocean dumping and mining.

People once assumed that the ocean was so large that all pollutants would be diluted and dispersed to safe levels. But in reality, they have not disappeared - and some toxic man-made chemicals have even become more concentrated as they have entered the food chain.

Tiny animals at the bottom of the food chain, such as plankton in the oceans, absorb the chemicals as they feed. Because they do not break down easily, the chemicals accumulate in these organisms, becoming much more concentrated in their bodies than in the surrounding water or soil. These organisms are eaten by small animals, and the concentration rises again. These animals are in turn eaten by larger animals, which can travel large distances with their even further increased chemical load.

Press Conference Against Ocean Pollution

Animals higher up the food chain, such as seals, can have contamination levels millions of times higher than the water in which they live. And polar bears, which feed on seals, can have contamination levels up to 3 billion times higher than their environment.

People become contaminated either directly from household products or by eating contaminated seafood and animal fats. Evidence is mounting that a number of man-made chemicals can cause serious health problems - including cancer, damage to the immune system, behavioral problems, and reduced fertility.

The origin of the plastic most likely came from the ocean surface abundant with plastic pollution. This plastic pollution has grown steadily over the years. The plastic back in 1980 was mostly of polyethylene which primarily comes from  plastic bags and plastic bottles. The plastic is carried around the ocean via wind and ocean currents. If these picture speak anything of meaning to you, i hope the message is clear. Do your part and pick up a piece of liter if you see some. Also a great way to help out is by participating in local stream and river cleanups in your area.

(unquote)

Photos courtesy of Alberni Environmental Coalition On-Line Library, Visual Dictionary Online, Gavin Newman / Fire Earth, Environment Pollution-think about it. DailyStoke.com, 2305 The Oceans: A Physical Geography, freefoto.com, www.deepsea.co.za, and 'Testing the Waters' Press Conference

Original Source: www.deepsea.co.za and Visual Dictionary Online

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